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Focus on Inquiry - Part 2
In Inquiry Learning
Mary-Rose Grieve
Dec 14, 2020
I am months behind, I'm afraid - not just in this discussion, but in my thinking, hence my reply not entirely addressing the question! Before even being ready to think about the different types of inquiry models, I have to grapple with how the teaching and learning model in school, and the curriculum which sits underneath it, can have an inquiry framework which sits meaningfully underneath it. @Elizabeth made a very interesting point earlier in this discussion about getting stuck in the 'top level' with one of the excellent workbooks from FOSIL, and it struck me that this is exactly what appeals to teachers - the workbooks are easily amended to suit a topic or research project and means that time is not wasted on having to think any deeper about how to make it work; changing a way of working, or pre existing lesson plans is not an endeavour much appreciated by teachers who are time poor. The trick for librarians is to show them that applying one of these frameworks to their own thinking and planning means that it is saving time, not spending it! FOSIL's clear cycle and processes and excellent resources are what drew me to to it in the first place, but I really like the addition of the affective domain in the Alberta model. I think, in essence, what I am trying to say is that FOSIL is more easily explained to teachers because it provides a clear visual framework and resources which they can use quickly; however, reading the Alberta model, and more of the Learning Memos, and @Darryl Toerien's comments here, it is clear that it deserves a more thorough and considered approach to really understand how it meshes into the curriculum, and doesn't just sit on top as an easy way to deliver a lesson.
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Mary-Rose Grieve
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